February 27, 2024

Introduction

The World Health Organization (WHO) has released a study that suggests that people who work long hours are putting themselves at risk of death. The study looked at people aged 35 to 54 and found that Long Working Hours WERE killing 745,000 people a year. The report also showed workers were taking less time off from work than they did 10 years ago – up from 24% to 26%. Workers now on average spend 34 minutes commuting to and from work each day, the same as they did in 1989

The study was looking at people aged 35 to 54 and found that Long Working Hours WERE killing 745,000 people a year.

the study was published in the Lancet on Wednesday.

The study, published in The Lancet on Wednesday, found that the average life expectancy across all countries was 73.8 years in 2016—a 0.6 year increase since 2012. But there were large disparities between countries and within countries themselves.

It’s not just that people are working longer. They’re also working more unhealthy hours.

The problem is not just that people are working longer, but also that they’re working more unhealthy hours. Workers are putting in more time at the office, but there’s less time off for rest and relaxation.

This has created a vicious cycle: as workers continue to put in more hours and lose their weekends with their families and friends, they get burned out on life–which makes them even less likely to take a vacation or even simply go home early on Fridays. This means that people who might otherwise be able to relax after work are now stuck working through those weekends instead of enjoying them with family members or loved ones; this can lead directly into depression or other mental health issues.

The report found that over half of workers in this age group worked for at least 55 hours each week, with nearly one in five putting in more than 65 hours.

This can lead to stress and burnout, which can then affect their health and wellbeing.

Stress is a leading cause of disease and illness worldwide, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). It’s also linked to heart disease, depression and poor mental health–and it’s not just limited to people who work long hours: studies have shown that people who are stressed out tend to eat worse as well as have higher body mass indexes (BMI).

The study also showed workers were taking less time off from work than they did 10 years ago – up from 24% to 26%.

The researchers said this could be partly explained by the rise of part-time working. They said that with more flexible working hours, people were encouraged to take shorter breaks on average even if it means working more hours overall.

They added: “The UK workforce is becoming increasingly unhealthy and exhausted as a result of long hours at work.”

Workers now on average spend 34 minutes commuting to and from work each day, the same as they did in 1989.

  • Commuting is stressful and has been linked to higher risk of heart disease, diabetes and depression.

  • Commuting can be made better by public transport options like walking or cycling instead of driving, which reduces pollution while also helping people get fit by reducing their levels of body fat (which increases risk of heart disease).

Working long hours kills your health and wellbeing, but there are ways to make it better

It’s important to make sure you are taking regular breaks and limiting your working hours.

  • Take a break every hour or two, if possible.

  • Set a limit on the number of hours you work in a day, so that there are no surprises when it comes to time off or other commitments (e.g., socialising with friends).

Conclusion

We’ve made some good progress over the past few decades, but how we work is still a huge problem for many. The research shows that increasing productivity doesn’t always mean we have more time to do what’s important in our lives. We need to take care of ourselves and each other so that as a nation we can all live healthier, happier lives.

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